22nd Annual National Conference

Enhancing the States' Lake Management Programs

On the Edge:  Enhancing Ecological
Integrity of Shorelines


April 14 – 17, 2009
Holiday Inn Chicago Mart Plaza    Chicago, Illinois

cosponsored by
Chicago Botanic Garden
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
    Headquarters Office of Wetlands, Oceans & Watersheds
    Region 5 - Water Division
North American Lake Management Society

 

pondEach year for over two decades, State lake program managers have gathered in Chicago to discuss successes, evaluate obstacles, and examine new approaches for improving the States’ lake management programs.  In 2009, over 125 attendees explored creative ways to restore and protect our fragile lakeshore ecosystems.  Special sessions enabled conference participants to be the first to hear hot-off-the-press preliminary results of the U.S. EPA's National Lakes Assessment.

Leaders from statewide lake associations gained new insights from their sister associations across the country.  And together, State agency staff and statewide lake association leaders explored new opportunities for future cooperation.  Federal and local managers joined in the lively discussions, both during the sessions and at special programs offered during luncheons and evening social functions

Please direct any questions about the conference to Bob Kirschner, the Conference Coordinator, at bkirschn@chicagobotanic.org

 

 

AGENDA

 

Click here to download the Conference Program,
including ALL abstracts, as a .pdf document.

 

In the agenda that follows, underlined presenter names or presentation titles link to .pdf files of their PowerPoint Presentation.

 

TUESDAY, APRIL 14

7:30 a.m.—5:00 p.m.

WORKSHOP AND CONFERENCE REGISTRATION

9:00 a.m.—4:00 p.m.

Pre-Conference Workshop:
LANDSCAPING AT THE WATER’S EDGE: ECOLOGICAL DESIGNS FOR WATER QUALITY AND HABITAT IMPROVEMENT

While we often see landscaping practices as the culprit for creating water quality impacts, it does not have to be that way.  When left to their own, natural landscapes are integral to water quality protection.  However, in developed areas there are many design challenges inherent in balancing local culture and perceptions, aesthetics, and ecology.  With a thoughtful approach based on a careful site assessment—together with an understanding of key ecological principles—landscape design can actually improve water quality while also providing a host of environmental functions.  This workshop will cover proven approaches and highlight available resources for engaging watershed communities and practitioners in using ecological landscaping design to protect water quality, reduce shoreline erosion, and enhance aquatic and riparian habitat.

This interactive workshop will examine recent research on shoreline development impacts to water quality and include an overview of the “following the flow” site assessment and inventory technique.  Ecological design principles for shoreline landscaping, addressing environmental functions of a natural shoreline, considerations for replanting buffers and shoreland vegetation, sources for native and naturalized vegetation (and how to work with local nurseries to obtain them), simple drainage and runoff controls, shoreline stabilization techniques, reducing impacts of turf management, pervious technologies and bioengineering, and demonstration projects all will be covered. We’ll emphasize what can be done at the local level as well as how to best ensure a successful outcome.

Workshop Presenters:  Jeffrey A. Schloss, University of New Hampshire Extension and Center for Freshwater Biology, Durham, N.H.; Mary M. Blickenderfer, North Central Research and Outreach Center, University of Minnesota Extension, Grand Rapids, Minn.; and Patrick O. Goggin; Wisconsin Lakes Partnership, University of Wisconsin Extension, Stevens Point, Wis.

plant 

2:00—5:00 p.m.

Pre-Conference Workshop:
WRITING TO BE READ: TIPS FOR HANGING ONTO READERS (AND LISTENERS)

In these days of desktop publishing and Web content creation, suddenly everyone is a writer and an editor . . . ready or not!  This interactive hands-on workshop is packed with valuable tips that work equally well whether your audience is the general public or a group of experts, and whether your communication will be delivered via print, online, or as a live presentation.

Workshop Presenter:  Eleanor Ely; Freelance Science Writer and Editor of
“The Volunteer Monitor” newsletter, San Francisco, Calif.

hospitality social picture
 
7:00—10:00 p.m.

HOSPITALITY SOCIAL
 
 

 

 

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15

7:30 a.m.—5:00 p.m.

WORKSHOP AND CONFERENCE REGISTRATION

8:30—11:30 a.m.

Pre-Conference Workshop:
WRITING TO BE READ: TIPS FOR HANGING ONTO READERS (AND LISTENERS)

NOTE:  This is a repeat of the Pre-Conference Workshop held Tuesday afternoon
at 2 p.m.

8:30—11:30 a.m.

Pre-Conference Workshop:
THE COLLABORATIVE NATIONAL LAKES ASSESSMENT:  RESULTS, OPTIONS FOR STATE SURVEYS, AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR CHANGE

During summer 2007, States, Tribes, and U.S. EPA collaboratively sampled over 1,200 lakes across the country in pursuit of a National Lakes Assessment (NLA).  Completion of the NLA marks the first comprehensive, nationwide evaluation of lakes since the National Eutrophication Survey of the 1970s.  The NLA is set apart from other national-scale lake assessment initiatives in that it is statistically designed and focuses on multiple indicators of water quality, ecological integrity, and recreational suitability.  The goals of this special pre-conference workshop are twofold:

The U.S. EPA especially encourages State lake program staff involved with the NLA to attend this important information-sharing workshop.

Workshop Presenters:  Neil C. Kamman, Vermont Agency of Natural Resources (on detail to U.S. EPA), Waterbury, Vt; Richard Mitchell, U.S. EPA, Washington, D.C.; and Anne Weinberg, U.S. EPA, Washington, D.C.

1:00—1:30 p.m.

CONFERENCE BEGINS: WELCOMES AND OPENING REMARKS

Bharat Mathur; Acting Regional Administrator, U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency–Region 5, Chicago, Ill.

Harry L. Gibbons, Jr.; President, North American Lake Management Society, Madison, Wis.

1:30—1:45 p.m.

WATER PLANTS

A delight of sight and sound produced by Amy Kowalski and Robert Korth at the University of Wisconsin Extension, Stevens Point, Wis.

1:45—2:30 p.m.

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Understanding Public Perceptions of Native Vegetation and Landscaping: Working with "Neatniks" to Restore Our Lakeshores
Fred J. Rozumalski; Landscape Ecologist, Barr Engineering Company, Minneapolis, Minn.

2:30—3:00 p.m.

BREAK

3:00—5:00 p.m.

STATE/REGIONAL APPROACHES TO PROTECT AND ENHANCE LAKE SHORELANDS AND NEARSHORE WATERS

5:00—7:00 p.m.

WELCOMING RECEPTION

7:00—8:30 p.m.

NALMS AFFILIATES MEETING

7:00—11:00 p.m.

HOSPITALITY SOCIAL

 

 

THURSDAY, APRIL 16

7:00—8:30 a.m.

BREAKFAST BUFFET

8:30—10:00 a.m.

UNDERSTANDING THE RESULTS OF THE NATIONAL LAKES SURVEY

Just How Good Are the Nation’s Lakes? Water Quality, Recreational Suitability, and Ecological Integrity of Lakes and Reservoirs Based on the National Lakes Assessment
Neil C. Kamman, Vermont Agency of Natural Resources (on detail to US Environmental Protection Agency), Waterbury, Vt.

Partnership Opportunities for Statewide Assessments of Lake Condition
Steven A. Heiskary, Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, St. Paul, Minn.

Finding the Story in the Data:  New Exploration and Analysis Tools for Analysis and Explanation of Probability-Based Lake Survey Data
John A. Kiddon, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Narragansett, R.I.

10:00—10:30 a.m.

BREAK

10:30 a.m.—noon

LAKE SHORELINE ASSESSMENT AND CLASSIFICATION APPROACHES

Development of Multi-Dimensional Littoral Zone Habitat Fingerprints for Classification and Management of Lakes
Sara M. Schmidt; Wisconsin Cooperative Fishery Research Unit, Stevens Point, Wis.

Measuring the Effects of Lakeshore Development on Littoral Habitat: A Quantitative Approach
Kellie C. Merrell; Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation, Waterbury, Vt.

A Nationally Consistent and Easily Implemented Approach to Evaluate Littoral and Riparian Habitat Quality in Lakes and Reservoirs
Richard M. Mitchell; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

noon—1:30 p.m.

LUNCHEON & ADDRESS

Key People and Events over 200 years of Conservation History in North America
Randy J. Stark; Chief Warden, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison, Wis.

2:00 p.m. sharp!

BUSES DEPART HOLIDAY INN FOR CHICAGO BOTANIC GARDEN

2:45 p.m.

CONVENE AT CHICAGO BOTANIC GARDEN FOR GROUP PHOTO

Welcome by Sophia Siskel; President and CEO, Chicago Botanic Garden

3:00—5:00 p.m.

SHORELINE LANDSCAPING TO REDUCE SHORELINE EROSION, ENHANCE HABITAT, AND PROVIDE DESIRED AESTHETICS

Shoreline Restoration:  Getting to the “Roots” of the Issue
Mary M. Blickenderfer; University of Minnesota Extension, Grand Rapids, Minn.

How We Abuse Shorelines—And Why
William W. Jones, Indiana University, Bloomington, Ind.

Shorelines That Work:  Native Plantings Heal Erosive Lakeshores and Provide Impressive Visual Appeal
Robert J. Kirschner; Chicago Botanic Garden, Glencoe, Ill.

Shoreline Stabilization in the Lake Champlain Basin:  Lessons Learned
Bonnie K. Waninger; Lamoille County Planning Commission, Morrisville, Vt.

5:15—6:00 p.m.

LAKESHORE & GARDEN TOURS AT THE CHICAGO BOTANIC GARDEN

6:00—9:30 p.m.

RECEPTION, DINNER, & SPECIAL PRESENTATION

SPECIAL PRESENTATION: From Walden to Wobegon: The Eros, Myth, and History of America's Kettle Lakes
Robert M. Thorson; Professor of Geology, Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, Department of Anthropology, and Center for Integrated Geosciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Conn.


Dr. Thorson is a geologist, Op-Ed journalist, and award-winning author.  With 30 years experience teaching more than a few recalcitrant students, “Thor” has developed a knack for making landscape science fascinating to a wide range of audiences.  He also has a passion for the study and protection of kettle lakes, and he’s co-founder of The Stone Wall Initiative.  Suffice it to say he has an incredible array of interests—sit back and enjoy his entertaining style as he weaves them all together for us!

 

 

FRIDAY, APRIL 17

7:00—8:30 a.m.

BREAKFAST BUFFET

8:30—10:00 a.m.

ENGAGING THE PUBLIC

A Roadmap for Informed Stakeholder Decisions on Lake Restoration and Protection
Robert Morgan; Beaver Water District, Lowell, Ark.

Maine/New Hampshire Youth Conservation Corps:  Raising Community Awareness and Inspiring Environmental Leadership in Youth Through On-the-Ground Work in Lake Watersheds
Linda B. Schier; Acton Wakefield Watersheds Alliance, Union, N.H.

Data and Information From the National Lakes Assessment: How Can They Best Serve Local Needs?
Sarah Lehmann; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Chicago, Ill.

10:00—10:30 a.m.

BREAK

10:30 a.m.—noon

EFFECTS OF NEARSHORE HABITAT ALTERATIONS AND SHORELINE DEVELOPMENT

Effects of Shoreline Urbanization on Aquatic-Terrestrial Coupling in Lakes
Tessa B. Francis; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Seattle, Wash.

Use of Periphyton in the Detection of Nearshore Water Quality Problems
Kenneth J. Wagner; AECOM Environment, Willington, Conn.

Redefining the Edge:  Managing Lake Waco Water Levels for Shoreline Habitat Enhancement
Thomas M. Conry; City of Waco, Waco, Texas

noon—1:30 p.m.

LUNCHEON & ADDRESS

Future Directions for U.S. EPA's Water Program
Benita Best-Wong; Director, Assessment and Watershed Protection Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C.

1:30 p.m.

CONFERENCE ADJOURNS

There was a drawing for a free registration to NALMS’ International Symposium in Hartford, Connecticut, on October 28-31. Congratulations to SARA SCHMIDT from the University of Wisconsin -- she was the lucky winner!